Reading Responses · Uncategorized

#AlloftheHashtags

Word Count: 598

When you post something on social media, why do you post it? What is it that you are documenting for the public sphere to see? According to Gregory Paschalidis, “amateur photographers have been known to record incessantly the relics of the past and the trivia of family life” (Paschalidis, G. 634). Gregory Paschalids also defines his opinion of a contemporary photographer is his article. He says a contemporary photographer is someone who uses their personal camera to document public events as they happen (Paschalidis, G. 634). What do you consider yourself (Paschalidis, G. 634).

I would be considered an amateur photographer. I normally take and post pictures of my weight loss journey, family, and friends. My Instagram is filled with a sea of hash tags and capitations that have increased the amount of likes and comments. Some people that I follow become Instagram famous because of the type of photos they post. I do not understand why followers are so interested in what people are wearing or what they are eating. In the article, Gregory Paschalids elaborates on my question by saying, “Non-mainstream media outlets and journalistic practices spawned in the digital era” (Paschalidis, G. 634).

Eddy Borges-Rey’s opinion of society continuously documenting their day-to-day lives is because of “new portable, low-cost, easy-to-use…make it easy for people to shoot and share” (Borges-Rey, E. 571). “On November 14, 2013…the French daily Libération was published without any photographs” (Paschalidis, G. 634). This helped the readers’ organize their thought process of the stories being reported without any photos, which caused blacked out spaces of censorship, creating a political significance for that newspaper (Paschalidis, G. 635). Gregory Paschalids described the role of photographs and what their significance is to an article. He goes on talking about how the constant struggle of choosing the best photograph is apart of our daily routine. (Paschalidis, G. 636).

Infinite gratitude comes from the correct filter that makes one feel as if they are on fleak. Being on fleak draws more attention to your posts on social media. The more attention your posts get the more likely you will attract more followers and you will be more likely to trend on Instagram. With this bold gesture of the current trend of citizen photojournalism it is degrading professional photojournalism. Gregory Paschalidis mentions that, “in the past few years, amateur-made photos have repeatedly featured in the pages of Libération” (Paschalidis, G. 634). However, Eddy Borges-Rey disagrees. He believes that citizen photojournalism is more authentic rather than professional when being reported.

The professional and amateur divide is a low key war in the publishing environment. Are people going to produce crappy quality photos or are they going to take their time by getting the right angle and contrast with the lighting and produce a smaller quantity? That is the real question. I believe when people are posting events that are traumatic they are doing it to share their eyewitness statement not because they are trying to get publicity. Eddy Borges-Rey says it is considered as the, “eyewitness category” (Borges-Rey, E. 572). He continues to state that people believe to be doing their civic duty by reporting certain events that happen. When I watch the news most of the time; the live coverage comes from normal, amateur citizens that are recording live events that are unfolding in front of them. For example, public shootings, fights, or racism events are what people send into the news channel stations and appear on the six o clock news. People provide free labor by contributing their video clips and photographs of those events stated above.

Works Cited

Borges-Rey, E. (2015). Images on Instagram.pdf. Retrieved March 25, 2017.

Paschalidis, G. (2015). Mini Cameras.pdf. Retrieved March 25, 2017.

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